AFRICAN

ORCHIDS

Read more of cultivation of Oeceoclades gracillima (Schltr.) Garay & P.Taylor
Culture:
Light:
2000-3000 fc. Light should be filtered or diffused, and plants should not be exposed to direct midday sun. Strong air movement should be provided at all times.
Temperatures:
Summer days average 81-83F (27-27C), and nights average 68F (20C), with a diurnal range of 13-15F (7-8C).
Humidity:
80-85% for most of the summer into early autumn. Averages then drop to near 65% in winter and early spring.
Water:
Rainfall in the region is heavy in summer and early autumn, but averages then fall quickly into a dry season that extends for 6-7 months from midautumn through the following spring. Cultivated plants should be watered heavily and be allowed to dry out completely while actively growing. Water should be reduced after growth is completed, however.
Fertilizer:
1/4-1/2 recommended strength, applied weekly when plants are actively growing. Many growers prefer to use a balanced fertilizer throughout the year; but others use a high-nitrogen fertilizer from spring to midsummer, then switch to one high in phosphates in late summer and autumn.
Rest period:
Winter days average 77-78F (25-26C), and nights average 62-64F (17-18C), with a diurnal range of 14-15F (8C). Water should be reduced after growth is completed and the plants kept almost dry until new growth starts in spring. Fertilizer should be eliminated until heavier watering is resumed.
Growing media:
Bechtel, Cribb, & Launert (1980) recommended growing the Oeceoclades species in a medium comprised of equal parts of peat, loam, and sand. A mix of 1/3 fine fir bark, 1/3 perlite, 1/6 sand, and 1/6 peat moss should also work well. Fertilizer must be faithfully applied, however, since few nutrients are available from these mediums.
References:
This information is quoted from a Charles and Margaret Baker culture sheet, with permission from Troy Meyers This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The entire culture sheet can be obtained by subscription from Orchid Species Culture, http://orchidculture.com









Oeceoclades seychellarum (Rolfe ex Summerh.) Garay & P.Taylor, Bot. Mus. Leafl. 24: 272 (1976).
Homotypic Synonyms:
Eulophia seychellarum Rolfe ex Summerh., Bull. Misc. Inform. Kew 1928: 393 (1928).
Eulophidium seychellarum (Rolfe ex Summerh.) Summerh., Bull. Jard. Bot. État Bruxelles 27: 402 (1957).
Description :
Vegetatively the plants of Oeceoclades seychellarum are identical with those of Oeceoclades lanceata. The two may be kept apart on account of the differences in the floral structures, especially in the shape and proportion of the lip. Midlobe of lip reniform in outline, one-fourth the length of the entire lip; lateral lobes broadly rounded at apex. Its sepals and petals are yellowish-white, while the labellum is white with some streaks.
Habitat :
Oeceoclades seychellarum is a terrestrial orchid species in the genus Oeceoclades that was endemic to the island of Mahé in the Seychelles but is now considered to be extinct.
This species is only represented by the type specimen, collected in May 1902 from the Cascade Estate on the island of Mahé at an elevation of 900 feet (270 m) in what was then a mountain forest.[1][3] The location from which the type specimen was collected is now degraded by human activity and invasive plants. Oeceoclades seychellarum was listed as being cultivated at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew in 1905, but not after that date.
Notes :
It was first described by the English botanist V.S. Summerhayes in 1928 as Eulophia seychellarum, a name that Summerhayes based on an unpublished manuscript name provided by Robert Allen Rolfe. Summerhayes later moved the species to the genus Eulophidium in 1957 and it was again transferred to the genus Oeceoclades in 1976 by Leslie Andrew Garay and Peter Taylor. Garay and Taylor noted that this species is similar to O. lanceata in vegetative morphology, but these species differ in floral characteristics, especially in the shape and proportions of the labellum. The midlobe of the labellum in Oeceoclades seychellarum is proportionally shorter than that of O. lanceata when compared to the length of the entire labellum.
Distribution:
Seychelles (Mahé)
References:
Summerhayes, V. S. 1928. New plants from the Seychelles. Bulletin of Miscellaneous Information (Royal Gardens, Kew), 1928(10): 388-395 ; Garay, L.A., and P. Taylor. 1976. The genus Oeceoclades Lindl. Botanical Museum Leaflets, Harvard University 24(9): 249-274.
Images:
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Oeceoclades antsingyensis G.Gerlach, J. Orchideenfr. 2: 62 (1995).
Description:
Terrestrial with an ovoid pseudobulb carrying a single, apical, broad, dark green horizontally variegated white, ovate leaf that blooms in the early summer on an erect, 30 to 40 cm long, densely several flowered inflorescences.
Habitat:
Found in western Madagascar in humus pockets at elevations of 60 to 100 meters.
Notes:
It was first described by Günter Gerlach in 1995. The type specimen was collected approximately 13 km (8.1 mi) west of Antsalova.
Distribution:
W. Madagascar
References:
Orchids of Madagascar Hermans 2007; Field Guide to the Orchids of Madagascar Cribb & Herman 2009
Images:
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Oeceoclades callmanderi Bosser, Adansonia, sér. 3, 28: 46 (2006).
Description:
Herbe pérenne, terrestre, à rhizome ligneux de 4-5 mm de diamètre. Racines charnues, blanchâtres, sur le sec un peu verruqueuses, de 3-4 mm de diamètre. Pseudobulbes unifoliés, homoblasti-ques, linéaires-cylindriques, longs de 8-9 cm et de 0,6-0,8 mm de diamètre, à 3-4 nœuds, les nœuds portant des gaines membraneuses, brunâtres, se résolvant en fibres, cachant entièrement le pseudobulbe et le dépassant, la gaine apicale longuement linéaire, atteignant 13-14 cm de longueur. Feuille glabre, à limbe linéaire, plan, papyracé, longuement atténué en pointe aiguë au sommet, étroitement cunéiforme et rétréci sur le pétiole à la base, 30-32 x 1-1,3 cm, à 3 nervures principales longitudinales saillantes sur la face inférieure. Pétiole long de 23-24 cm, côtelé, articulé à environ 10 cm de la base. Inflorescence dépassant peu la feuille, longue de 65-75 cm, en racème simple. Pédoncule long de 50-60 cm, grêle, ± sinueux, glabre, portant 3-4 gaines caulinaires ovales à oblongues, sub-aiguës, membraneuses, longues de 1-1,5 cm. Racème long d’environ 15 cm, lâche, à 10-15 fleurs, celles de la base distantes de 1,5-2 cm ; axe glabre ; bractées florales petites, étroitement triangulaires-aiguës, longues de 34 mm. Ovaire pédicellé glabre, long de 1-1,5 cm ; pédicelle long de 0,5-1 cm. Fleur blanche lavée de pourpre. Sépale médian, étroitement obovale, obtus, 14-15 x 4-4,5 mm. Sépales latéraux étroi tement obovales, sub-aigus, un peu falciformes, 11-12 x 4-5 mm. Pétales étroitement obovales, sub-aigus, un peu asymétriques à la base, 11-12 x 5 mm. Labelle quadrilobé, plus large que long, long de 11-12 mm, large de 17-18 mm, à base largement arrondie, lobes latéraux obtus, lobes terminaux arrondis à subtronqués au sommet, longs de 5-6 mm, divergents et délimitant entre eux une profonde échancrure dont la marge est récurvée au fond du sinus sur les fleurs adultes ; callus sur le palais, charnu, glabre, dressé, bilobé, haut de ± 1,5 mm, prolongé vers l’avant jusqu’au creux du sinus par 3 carènes basses, arrondies, contiguës, finement papilleuses. Éperon peu visible sous le labelle, scrotiforme, courtement cylindrique, arrondi au sommet, base soudée au labelle, partie libre longue de 1,5-2 mm. Colonne haute de 6 mm, un peu concave sur la face antérieure. Anthère transversalement elliptique, large de 2 mm, munie à l’avant d’une courte pointe obtuse et pourvue à l’arrière d’un appendice charnu, conique, un peu échancré au sommet, long de 0,5 mm. Pollinies ovoïdes, longues de 0,8-0,9 mm.
Etymology:
It was first described by the French botanist Jean Marie Bosser in 2006 and named in honor of one of the collectors, M. W. Callmander.
Habitat:
Espèce endémique du NE de Madagascar, de la forêt littorale du Cap Masoala, connue par une seule récolte.
Distribution:
NE. Madagascar
References:
Contribution à l’étude des Orchidaceae de Madagascar, des Comores et des Mascareignes. XXXV. Description d’un Oeceoclades nouveau de Madagascar, et notes sur trois genres nouveaux pour les Mascareignes by 45ADANSONIA, sér. 3 • 2006 • 28 (1)© Publications Scientifi ques du Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Paris. www.adansonia.comContribution à l’étude des Orchidaceae de Madagascar, des Comores et des Mascareignes. XXXV. Description d’un Oeceoclades nouveau de Madagascar, et notes sur trois genres nouveaux pour les MascareignesJean BOSSER
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Oeceoclades ambrensis (H.Perrier) Bosser & Morat, Adansonia, sér. 3, 23: 11 (2001).
Homotypic Names:
Lissochilus ambrensis H.Perrier, Notul. Syst. (Paris) 14: 159 (1951).
Eulophia ambrensis (H.Perrier) Butzin, Willdenowia 7: 587 (1975).
Description:
The pseudobulbs are fusiform (spindle-shaped) and homoblastic (created from several internodes). Oeceoclades ambrensis is most similar to Oeceoclades pulchra but it differs in the structure of the labellum, having rounded lobes.
Habitat:
Oeceoclades ambrensis is a terrestrial orchid species in the genus Oeceoclades that is endemic to northern Madagascar, where it grows in humid forests at altitudes of 1,000–1,100 metres (3,300–3,600 ft).
Note:
It was first described by the French botanist Joseph Marie Henry Alfred Perrier de la Bâthie in 1951 as Lissochilus ambrensis and moved to the genus Eulophia in 1975 by Friedhelm Reinhold Butzin. It was last transferred to the genus Oeceoclades in 2001 by Jean Marie Bosser and Philippe Morat. The type specimen was collected in 1924 from montagne d'Ambre, now a part of Amber Mountain National Park.
Distribution:
N. Madagascar
References:
Bosser, J., and P. Morat. 2001. Contribution à l'étude des Orchidaceae de Madagascar et des Mascareignes. XXXI. Espèces et combinaisons nouvelles dans les genres Oeceoclades, Eulophia et Eulophiella. Adansonia, 23(1): 7-22.
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In culture In culture In culture
Oeceoclades ambrensis 01 Oeceoclades ambrensis 02 Oeceoclades ambrensis 03
Photograph© Lourens
Grobler. Image used
with kind permission.
Photograph© Lourens
Grobler. Image used
with kind permission.
Photograph© Lourens
Grobler. Image used
with kind permission.